Rural Legend

24 thoughts on “Rural Legend”

  1. With a lump in my throat and mist in my eyes, I say wow! Thank you for your story and the stirrings of my own legends memory’s

  2. I am encouraged by you writings. I have stories crying to escape the recesses of my mind. Stretching to be told, to be set free.

  3. I have just spent the day reading all of your writings, You are a very special gifted author. Thank you for your stories which remind me so much of my early years raised by my Grandparents on their farm in the Midwest.

  4. Thank you again and again. Your writing is sheer poetry and it leaves me wanting more and more. Where can I find all of your work? I have not enjoyed anything as much since an old preacher man use to come to our house at night in the East Tennessee mountains and spin tales about “haints and painters”. It made the hairs on my neck stand on end. I’ve enjoyed tales like this for seventy years and it is good to find more. Wonderful!!!!

  5. Thank you–this could be a new place for us to look for some more family history information.

    I have truly enjoyed reading through your posts and look forward to more.

  6. Curious as to how you picked the name Proffitt? It is my family name and we have roots in the areas of Black Mountain in NC up through the mountains to West Virginia.

  7. You had something some time back about the miners (maybe Middleboro, Ky) & I’ve lost it, would like to see it again (one of them was about coal dust)

  8. Where can I read more of your wonderful stories? I loved reading everything on your site and now I am acheing for more. Thank you for writing these beautiful words from your life. I just can’t imagine that you let me linger while thirsty for more. Laura-hope Scott

  9. As a proud East Tennessean, everything I’ve read here has brought a tear to my eye. Thanks for showing that we are a proud, strong bunch!

  10. I have for many years felt a sense of stirring within me, a restless uneasiness that has had no name. Your words have caused me to recognize the aching grief of longing for a home to which I cannot return.
    I now can name the unnamable; I would that I could express the inexpressible as you do.
    Your writing gives me a clearer glimpse of the undefinable with which I have no choice but to live. I may never be able to forgive you. Thank you. Please never stop.

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